FAQs

What kind of animal is a jellyfish?
Jellyfish are considered to be ancient, primitive organisms belonging to the phylum Cnidaria. They have lived in the world's oceans for 600 million years, predating even the dinosaurs!
Where are jellyfish found?
Jellyfish are found all over the world. The coastlines of the US, Hawaii, the Mediterranean Sea, Australia and South Africa are all seasonally infested with jellyfish. Over 100 million beachgoers worldwide are exposed to the hazard of jellyfish. Check our jellyfish world map to find which jellyfish are commonly found at specific locations.
Why do jellyfish sting?
Jellyfish are passive predators: they do not chase their prey. They paralyze it by firing a toxic dart into the victim. Once the prey is paralyzed it is either swallowed by the jellyfish (if it is small enough), or it stays glued to the tentacles, where it is slowly digested. Click here to learn about the jellyfish stinging mechanism: Jellyfish Stings: Hi-Tech Micro injections.
Coral can also sting. Is it related to jellyfish?
Corals, Sea Anemones and Hydrozoa all belong to the same phylum as jellyfish, called Cnidaria (pronounced with silent C as "nidaria"). All cnidarian organisms have a similar stinging mechanism.
Which is the most dangerous jellyfish in the world?
The Box Jellyfish inhabits the north-east coast of Australia and contains the most potent toxin in the marine environment. Its sting is extremely dangerous, and can be fatal.
Does Safe-Sea® protect swimmers against all types of jellyfish and sea lice?
Yes, Safe-Sea® eliminates stinging cell discharge and prevents skin penetration by the cnidaria sting mechanism. There are 15 000 species of jellyfish, coral hydroids and anemones. Their toxin content varies, but in common they have 30 types of stinging cells with the same mode of action. Safe-Sea® is designed to deactivate the stinging mechanism, and is therefore works for all types. Trials have confirmed it is effective against different types of toxic jellyfish.
Has Safe-Sea® been tested against many types of jellyfish?
Safe-Sea® is the only product which has been tested and proven to be effective against jellyfish stings. This includes clinical trials in several medical centers under double-blind conditions, with several types of jellyfish. These clinical trials were conducted on Sea Nettle in Stanford University Hospital, Box Jellyfish in Bert Fish Medical Center in Florida, and Rhopilema (toxic Mediterranean jellyfish) in Rambam Hospital, Israel. All trials demonstrated that Safe-Sea® provides effective protection against jellyfish stings. Other trials conducted by an independent Japanese team confirm that Safe-Sea® protects against Blue Bottle, Sea Wasp and Box Jellyfish stings (clinical test reports can be provided on request). These tests show that Safe-Sea® is effective, against even the most dangerous jellyfish.
If I get stung should I treat it with vinegar?
Vinegar is known to be highly effective if applied immediately when you are stung by a Box Jellyfish. Vinegar inhibits the firing mechanism of the stinging cells within those tentacles which remain attached to the skin, and which have not yet released their venom. However, it does not necessarily work on other types of jellyfish, and may even activate the stinging cells of some jellyfish species.
What are sea lice?
Sea lice are tiny jellyfish, also known as thimble jellyfish, which are very hard to spot and avoid. Water infested with sea lice can cause rashes and infections, sometimes called "Seabather’s Eruption". Sea lice infestations are very common in Florida and in the Caribbean during the summer months.
Is "Sea Nettle" a jellyfish?
Yes, sea nettle is one of the most common jellyfish found along the US coastline. Each year around a million bathers are stung by sea nettles along the beaches of Florida and Maryland (Chesapeake Bay).
Are you planning your next vacation near the ocean?
Click on the map below to find what types of jellyfish are found in each area of the world:
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